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Visit to the Land

We’ll Leave at Night

7:13 min. - When the lakes are very big, we cross them at night so the wind doesn't take us by surprise.

Transcription

David Pinette - I never thought this path was so deep. My parents didn't go this way. And I find it strange to be here before they are. I'm eager to tell them about it.
Caroline St-Onge - My mother had a way of talking about her life in the bush. She always mentioned how the Innu helped each other out. Now I know what she meant. In the bush, I experienced this sharing and natural mutual aid that she told me about. Time no longer exists. I do what I have to do, as my parents did. I am Innu Ishkueu.
Radio - Oka Crisis, August 1990 ... people on the South Shore, but there's no question of sending in the army to attack the barricades. The government is well aware that an armed confrontation would involve considerable risk. It's possible that the army is aiming for other actions completely unrelated to the evolution of negotiations but that might well...
Pierre Michel - It's better to be wary when the wind blows from the East. You find a good place for shelter. A site near water, with wood for the fire and branches for tents. The bigger the lake, the more unpredictable the wind. In a case like that, it's better to set up a camp and navigate by night.
Benoît Audette - When I was 12, I remember being impressed by the huge power lines. I heard strange noises and I was afraid.
Music - Philippe Mckenzie

A group of Innu rests by a fire in the early morning
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25 Related words or expressions

amipushu
quiet water surface
ka tshimanakaniht kukushuakanashkuat
place where the poles have been left
kakatshat
multi-leveled portage
kapatakan-meshkanau
portage path
kapatauat
they’re portaging
kassekau
fall
kusseupu
to fish
manukashunanu
they set up the camp
matapeshtau
he finishes portaging
minishtiku
island
nakatshun
at the foot of the rapids
naneu
shore
natai-kukushu
going upriver using a pole
nutinakamishtin
the breeze has made small ripples on the lake
pakauat
they disembark from the canoe
paushtiku
rapids
pimashu
he moves with the wind
piutamu
he descends the rapids in a canoe
takuaitsheu
she directs the canoe
tshiashi-nikuashkan
ancient cemetary
uanikamuat
getting into the canoe
uauakashkuaimuat
they row along a winding waterway
uiushuat
they carry baggage on their backs
ushkatakau
brush
utakuai-papamishkauat
they go out in the canoe in the evening



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